My Palm Warbler has left for Canada

Posted in florida garden, nature by paulie on April 18, 2010

 

It seems my Palm Warbler has got underway.  He is ‘mine’ because he comes to the place outside my window where I feed birds.  He visits every day of his winter vacation, which he has spent entirely within my small back yard since at least 2006.  Another Palm Warbler occupies my small front yard.  Usually these birds do not appear at any kind of feeder but my small friend somehow learned to eat the bird chow that my domestic birds didn’t want.  It’s how I know he is mine.

My hopes go with him as he flies through the night, probably for weeks, looking at the stars and sensing the Earth’s magnetic field to find the place in Canada where he will see his hen again if she has also survived.

I know his mission to make a new Palm Warbler is critical and much more important to him than risk to his own life but when November comes I will look for him every day.  I wish I could tell him that if he can somehow get back to me I will be ready with chow and orange slices and we’ll enjoy the mild winter days together one more time.

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Palm Warbler at the plant table

Posted in florida garden by paulie on December 2, 2009

Video proof! I first photographed the Palm Warbler who fed at my table in late 2007. This is unusual because, of course, the bird is an insectivore and not a visitor to any feeder. But among the seeds I put out are a kind of engineered nutrition pellet for domestic birds and this warbler has learned to eat those. I believe this is the same individual that learned to eat the pellets and who has wintered with me since at least 2006. He returned about a week ago and will be with me until mid-March of 2010. I am happy to contribute to the life of this formidable bird for as long as we cross paths. Here’s what I wrote about him in 2/08.

And, yes those are flower spikes on the Black Aloe in the picture. I am aware this is often referred to as a nonblooming kind of Aloe. Mine blooms regularly with long rests. The flowers are large and coral – orange.